Trust No Hoes – StarrBux

Our young boy is back with a new wave. Always moving forward, great characteristic to have. StarrBux is all about that, the title speaks for itself. I don’t trust them, either! Shout out to Aside, paving the path with his production. The track has melody, along with the energy, sounds like a knockout combo to me.

Pull up this track @YouTube

 

Larry Davis Era – Jamal Gasol & Quis Star

This is the type of movement I started our Featured Artist section for. The love that gets reciprocated can’t be bought. We truly get to watch artist grow into future stars. Currently, our topic today pays homage to a recognized hero from the past. As I listen to Larry Davis Era, I feel Jamal Gasol got his mission accomplished. This Is just my opinion, sounds like he wanted to shine light on the legend, plus incorporate the life of his own. Job well done!

The range in beats provided by Quis Star is like a telescope. His sound is becoming signature with Jamal.  Can’t out leave the features.

Not many guest appearances, however Benny The Butcher and Washy presence was felt. From the griddy raps to the smooth radio friendly vibe. It’s a complete project you will ride to. Listen now, leave your reaction in the comments.

 

Raw Results : Quick Hits

<img src="https://rhymeallnight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/009_RAW_02192018hm_0042-847ce9def17e01340a56243c8102a5f7.jpg" alt="" width="1200" height="675" />

 

                  

Jeff Jarrett to be inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame Class of 2018

<img src="https://rhymeallnight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Jeff-Jarrett-HOF-600x250.png" alt="" width="600" height="250" />

Source: http://www.wwe.com/shows/wwe-hall-of-fame/wwe-hall-of-fame-2018/article/jeff-jarrett-wwe-hall-of-fame-2018-inductee

Jeff Jarrett used to have one question for the WWE Universe during his incredible career: “Ain’t I great?”

While fans responded with boos and jeers then, today, the answer is undoubtedly affirmative. As first reported by NBCSports.com, Jarrett is the latest inductee into the WWE Hall of Fame’s Class of 2018, joining Goldberg, The Dudley Boyz and Ivory. He’ll take his place in sports-entertainment history on Friday, April 6, in New Orleans during WrestleMania 34 Week.

 

Double J’s road to the WWE Hall of Fame began at birth. The son of Tennessee wrestling promoter Jerry Jarrett, Jeff grew up around the industry, eventually becoming a referee before competing between the ropes at the age of 18. While many promoters’ sons had entered the ring and flamed out, Jarrett was a prodigy inside the squared circle. It was easy to see that he would be a Superstar as he competed against and alongside the likes of WWE Hall of Famers Jerry “The King” Lawler, Nick Bockwinkel and countless others.

However, when Jarrett finally made it to WWE in late 1993, he revealed that he had dreams bigger than the ring: He wanted to use sports-entertainment to make himself the biggest star in country music. Ahead of his arrival, Double J strutted around Music City, USA – Nashville – running down the country music establishment and claiming that the WWE was his road to stardom in the ring and on the stage.

Jarrett found success between the ropes, capturing the Intercontinental Championship three times during a heated rivalry with WWE Hall of Famer Razor Ramon and picking up countless victories with help from The Roadie, much to the dismay of the WWE Universe. Double J eventually backed up his big boasts about his musical prowess, releasing his debut single, “With My Baby Tonight,” with a music video and live performance at In Your House 2 in Nashville. However, after Jarrett’s WWE departure, it was revealed that all wasn’t as it seemed when it came to the hit single – Jarrett was lip-syncing; The Roadie was the voice behind the song.

Nonetheless, Jarrett continued his in-ring career in WCW in 1996, becoming one of the few proud Superstars that can call themselves a member of the legendary Four Horseman. During his year in WCW, Jarrett defeated Dean Malenko to capture the revered United States Championship.

 

Double J returned to WWE in late 1997 and developed a new, nasty attitude that matched the era in the company. Though he lost his long blonde locks in a match at SummerSlam 1998, it did not deter Jarrett from achieving success, whether it came fairly or by bashing his opponents with an acoustic guitar. During this stint in WWE, Jarrett captured the World Tag Team Titles with Owen Hart and claimed the European and Intercontinental Championships on his own.

Jarrett jumped back to WCW in 1999 and found his greatest success as a competitor, defeating fellow Hall of Famer Diamond Dallas Page in the final of a six-man tournament to win the vacant WCW World Championship. Jarrett engaged in rivalries with the likes of Ric Flair, Booker T, Sting and others while capturing the WCW World Title three more times before the company was purchased by WWE in 2001.

Jarrett continued to compete around the world and also began to promote shows that gave future WWE Superstars like AJ Styles, Bobby Roode and Eric Young their first major exposure.

Double J’s resume is one of the most impressive in sports-entertainment history. He’s a four-time WCW Champion, three-time United States Champion, six-time Intercontinental Champion, European Champion and World Tag Team Champion. And during WrestleMania 34 Week, Jeff Jarrett will add one more accolade to that list: WWE Hall of Famer.

 

(Analysis: Wow very shocking news to say the least, there had been rumors last few days, but honestly I just dismissed them. With all that being said there will be some who question if Jeff is HOF worthy, considering Ivory and Co Co Beware are considered HOF, then  Jeff is definitely worthy.)

 


Black History: By Richard Jackson – Marshall W. Taylor

“These rules may seem simple enough, but it will require great morale and physical courage to adhere to them. But if carried out in the strict sense of the word it will surely lead to a greater success than could otherwise be attained.”-Major Taylor
Taylor was born into poverty in Indianapolis in 1878, one of eight children in his family. His father, Gilbert, the son of a Kentucky slave, fought for the Union in the Civil War and then worked as a coachman for the Southards, a well-to-do family in Indiana. Marshall W. Taylor was just a teenager when he turned professional and began winning races on the world stage, and President Theodore Roosevelt became one of his greatest admirers. But it was not Taylor’s youth that cycling fans first noticed when he edged his wheels to the starting line. Nicknamed “the Black Cyclone,” he would burst to fame as the world champion of his sport almost a decade before the African-American heavyweight Jack Johnson won his world title. And as with Johnson, Taylor’s crossing of the color line was not without complication, especially in the United States, where he often had no choice but to ride ahead of his white competitors to avoid being pulled or jostled from his bicycle at high speeds.
Before his teenage years ended, Taylor became a professional racer with seven world records to his name. He won 29 of the 49 races he entered, and in 1899, he captured the world championship of cycling. Major Taylor was just the second black athlete to become a world champion, behind Canadian bantamweight George “Little Chocolate” Dixon, who had won his title a decade before.
#blackhistoryfacts #BHM #theblackcyclone

@nyceflix

By Biography